Wahhabists are Scared and No Match to the Christian Militia Groups

Wahhabists are Scared and No Match to the Communist Rebel Groups

Wahhabism (Arabic: وهابية‎, Wahhābiyyah) is an ultra-conservative[1] branch of Sunni Islam,[2][3] (though some people dispute that a Wahhabi is a Sunni).[4] It is a religious movement among fundamentalist Islamic believers, with an aspiration to return to the earliest fundamental Islamic sources of the Quran and Hadith, with inspiration from the teachings of Medieval theologian Ibn Taymiyyah and early jurist Ahmad ibn Hanbal.[5]

Initially, Wahhabism was a popular revivalist movement instigated by an eighteenth century theologian, Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab (1703–1792) from Najd, Saudi Arabia. He began his movement through peaceful discussions with attendees of various shrines[6] and eventually gained popular support by convincing the local Amir, Uthman ibn Mu’ammar, to help him in his struggle.[7] Ibn Abd Al-Wahhab advocated a popular purging of the widespread practices by Muslims being what he considered to be impurities and innovations in Islam.[citation needed]

Mohammed bin Abd Al-Wahhab’s teachings have become the dominant form of Islam in Saudi Arabia.[8] The movement claims to adhere to the correct understanding of the general Islamic doctrine of Tawhid, on the “uniqueness” and “unity” of God, shared by the majority of Islamic sects, but with an emphasis on advocating following of the Athari school of thought only.[9] Ibn Abd-al-Wahhab was influenced by the writings of Ibn Taymiyya and questioned the prevalent philosophical interpretations of Islam being the Ash’ari and Maturidi schools, claiming to rely on the Qur’an and the Hadith without speculative philosophy so as to not transgress beyond the limits of the early Muslims known as the Salaf.[9] He attacked a “perceived moral decline and political weakness” in the Arabian Peninsula and condemned what he perceived as idolatry, the popular cult of saints, and shrine and tomb visitation.[9]

The terms Wahhabi and Salafi and ahl al-hadith (people of hadith) are often used interchangeably, but Wahhabism has also been called “a particular orientation within Salafism”,[3] considered ultra-conservative and which rejects traditional Islamic legal scholarship as unnecessary innovation.[10][11] Salafism, on the other hand, has been termed as the hybridation between the teachings of Ibn Abdul-Wahhab and others which have taken place since the 1960s.[12]

The movement gained unchallenged precedence in the Arabian peninsula through an alliance between Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab and the House of Muhammad ibn Saud, which provided political and financial power for the religious revival represented by Ibn Abd al-Wahhab. The writer El Khabar Ousbouî suggests the popularity of the Wahhabi movement is in part due to this alliance and the funding of several religious channels.

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The National Liberation Front of Tripura (NLFT), a rebel group operating in Tripura, North-East India, has been described as engaging in terrorist violence motivated by their Christian beliefs.[14] The NLFT is currently proscribed as a terrorist organization in India.[15][16] It is classified by the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism as one of the ten most active terrorist groups in the world, and has been accused of forcefully converting people to Christianity.[17][18] The insurgency in Nagaland was originally led by the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN), and it is continued today by a faction named “NSCN–Isaac Muivah”, which explicitly calls for a “Nagalim for Christ”.[19] The state government reports that the Baptist Church of Tripura supplies arms and gives financial support to the NLFT.[17][18][20] In April 2000, the secretary of the Noapara Baptist Church in Tripura, Nagmanlal Halam, was arrested with a large quantity of explosives.

He confessed to illegally buying and supplying explosives to the NLFT for two years.[20][21] The NLFT has threatened to kill Hindus celebrating the annual five-day religious festival of Durga Puja and other religious celebrations.[22] At least 20 Hindus in Tripura have been killed by the NLFT in two years for resisting forced conversion to Christianity.[23] A leader of the Jamatia tribe, Rampada Jamatia, said that armed NLFT militants were forcibly converting tribal villagers to Christianity, which he said was a serious threat to Hinduism.[23] It is believed that as many as 5,000 tribal villagers were converted over two years.[23] These forcible conversions to Christianity, sometimes including the use of “rape as a means of intimidation,” have also been noted by academics outside of India.[24]

In early 2000, 16 Bengali Hindus were killed by the NLFT at Gourangatilla. On May 20, 2000, the NLFT killed 25 Bengali Hindus at the Bagber refugee camp.[25] In August 2000, a tribal Hindu spiritual leader, Shanti Kali, was shot dead by about ten NLFT guerrillas who said it wanted to convert all people in the state to Christianity.[26] In December 2000, Labh Kumar Jamatia, a religious leader of the state’s second largest Hindu group, was kidnapped by the NLFT, and found dead in a forest in Dalak village in southern Tripura. According to police, rebels from the NLFT wanted Jamatia to convert to Christianity, but he refused.[27] A local Marxist tribal leader, Kishore Debbarma, was clubbed to death in Tripura’s Sadar by militants from the Biswamohan faction of the NLFT in May 2005.[28] His body was found with multiple head injuries in a roadside ditch in the Katabon area.

John Joseph, the Christian representative of the National Minority Commission, stated in 2000 that foreign funds used for Christian terrorism in the northeast are routed through Christians in Kerala.[29]

In Assam in 2009, the Manmasi National Christian Army (MNCA), an extremist group from the Hmar tribe, were charged with forcing Hindus to convert at gunpoint.[30] Seven or more Hmar youths were charged with visiting Bhuvan Pahar, a Hindu village, armed with guns, and pressuring residents to convert to Christianity.[31] They also desecrated temples by painting crosses on the walls with their blood.[31] The Sonai police, along with the 5th Assam Rifles, arrested 13 members of the MNCA, including their commander-in-chief. Guns and ammunition were seized.[31][32]

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Ilaga

The Ilaga (Visayan: rat) is a Christian militia in the Philippines that operated during the 1970s in Southern Mindanao that fought against Moro Islamist[citation needed] militia.[1] Increased tensions in the Philippines since 2008 have since seen the reemergence of the armed vigilante group calling themselves the Bag-ong Ilaga (Visayan: New Ilaga).[2] Since 2008 violence flared up with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front and the Armed Forces of the Philippines after the Supreme Court of the Philippines overruled the proposed treaty for an Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. [1] [3] The group committed its bloodiest act in June 1971 when it massacred 65 civilians in a mosque. [4]

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About mrwakamiya33

Netbanging and Hacktivism are the best weapons in the Internet. Anominity is the best ARMOR.

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